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Desensitisation – treatment for pollen allergies

Did you know… the right time to think about treatment for pollen allergies is AFTER the pollen season?

For those of us who suffer from hay fever the ordeal for this year is over. Soon we will have forgotten all about the sneezing, eye watering and itching which pestered our lives for weeks and months.

What treatment is recommended and when​?

The only evidence-based treatment for pollen allergies is desensitisation, however this should be started three months before the season.

What is desensitisation?

Desensitisation is based on the administration of low doses of allergen on a regular basis, for about three years. To be sure to choose the right allergen for the treatment it is important to consider the exact time span when you had your symptoms, as well as your allergic sensitisation levels.

Is desensitisation only for comfort?

No, the use of powerful antihistamines is a problem as this causes tiredness and reduces performance at work and school. Desensitisation is definitely recommended for children with a three-year history of hay fever because of their higher risk of developing allergic asthma.

Where can I get a desensitisation treatment arranged?

Call Roseneath Medical Practice on 020 8940 9955 to book desensitisation treatment with Dr Robert Arlt MD, Consultant Paediatrician with a special interest in allergy.

Roseneath Medical Practice patients’ feedback 2019

If you would like to read further reviews about Roseneath Medical Practice please refer to our Google Business Page.

‘Dr Soori is the best doctor I’ve ever had. She is really patient, knowledgeable and attentive. She helped me with my issues and also arranged further tests for the same day. She contacted me straight away to discuss results from my scan. I recommend Dr Soori to all my friends and family. She is definitely the best family doctor in Richmond!’

‘Dr Soori is the GP all doctors should be – kind, caring, not rushed, taking the time to fully understand the problem and diagnosing with skill and thought. She is more than a doctor, also being a trusted confidante, a true family doctor, making herself available at short notice with genuine care and concern. I cannot recommend her highly enough!’

 

GP and Paediatrician in Richmond

 

‘We know Dr Robert Arlt for a number of years now. He always treated our children with excellent care. We regularly see Dr Arlt at Roseneath Medical Practice.
He is an excellent and caring paediatrician with lots of experience. We don’t live around Richmond but always happy to travel to see Dr Arlt.
Glad our children have got a fantastic doctor.’

‘I can highly recommend Dr Arlt. He is a very experienced and caring paediatrician whom we have seen since our daughter was born.’

Tick bite – first aid…

Did you know?

In the case of a tick bite, it is advisable to remove the tick within the first 24 hours in order to reduce the risk of Lyme disease.

How do we deal with tick bites?

You are more likely to see the tick, than feel the bite. That is why you should check for tick bites on yourself and your children after spending time in grasslands or woodlands. It is common knowledge that contracting Lyme disease is the main concern. There are special kits available from pharmacies to remove ticks, but you may also simply use tweezers or even a couple of credit cards. It is important to grasp the tick as close to the skin surface as possible, to gently pull upwards and to disinfect the area afterwards.

When shall I see a doctor?

Blood tests shortly after a tick bite are unreliable. You should look out for a circular red rash developing around the bite a couple of days later but it may even occur up to three months later. Blood tests at this stage may still be unreliable and you will normally be prescribed a three-week course of antibiotics to avoid the late stages of Lyme disease. Lyme disease can more rarely simply start with flu-like symptoms. In this case repeated blood tests at longer intervals will usually be necessary to confirm the diagnosis.

Is there anything else we should be aware of?

Another disease transmitted by ticks is tick-borne encephalitis, which does not occur in the UK but does occur in large parts of Central and Eastern Europe. Fortunately, there is a vaccination available against it, which is available at Roseneath Medical Practice.

by Dr Robert Arlt MD – GMC Reg: 6135708 
Consultant Paediatrician

Approximately 3,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed each year in the UK…

Did you know?…

Approximately 3,000 cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed each year in the UK?

Who is affected by cervical cancer?
• Cervical cancer mainly affects sexually active women aged between 30 and 45 years, although it
is possible for sexually active women of all ages to develop cervical cancer.
• The condition is very rare in women under 25 years of age.

What about Human papillomavirus?
• HPV is mainly transmitted through sexual intercourse. Most sexually active women and men will
be infected at some point in their lives and some may be repeatedly infected. The peak time for
acquiring infection is shortly after becoming sexually active. HPV infections usually clear up without
any intervention, but a small proportion of infections can lead to cervical cancer.
• Two HPV types (16 and 18) cause 70% of cervical cancers.
• Vaccination has been proven to be effective in preventing infection with HPV.

Why have cervical screening?
• The aim of cervical screening is to reduce the number of women who develop cervical cancer as well as those who
die from it. In fact since screening has been implemented it is estimated that at least 2,000 cases of cervical cancer are
prevented each year in the UK.

What are the guidelines for cervical screening?
• Women aged 25 to 49 years: screening every three years • Women aged 50 to 64 years: screening every five years.
• Women over 65 years: screening only for women that have recently had abnormal testing.

How can Roseneath Medical Practice help?
See Dr Soori, a female GP with an interest in Women’s health, for comprehensive cervical screening with HPV testing and
quick turnover of results.

Don’t be afraid of vaccinating, especially in view of the benefits vaccines bring…

Vaccinate – your fears allayed

Don’t be afraid of vaccinating, especially in view of the benefits vaccines bring, says Dr Robert Arlt

Apart from washing our hands, vaccinations are the only effective mean of preventing infectious diseases. Vaccinating most of the population against specific diseases helps eradicate them.
Of course, everything we do – eating and drinking, playing ball, crossing a street. – comes with some amount of risk. The same applies to vaccines, but how big is the risk really? For this article, I will restrict myself to talking about childhood routine vaccines in SA and in the European Union. Here the only live vaccines are against measles, mumps rubella, rotavirus and chicken pox: as the viruses they contain are very much weakened they will never harm children with a working immune system.

Concerns about Autism

Although a presumed link to Autism was never proved, in the United States, countries in the European Union and a few other affluent countries, thiomersal, a mercury-based preservative, is no longer used in routine childhood vaccination schedules.

Concerns about Aluminium

Many vaccines contain aluminium salts. They act as adjuvants, strengthening and lengthening the immune response to the vaccine. The vaccines we use nowadays contain very minimal amounts of aluminium, and recent studies did not show more aluminium salts in children who had been vaccinated than in children who had not. The view of most experts is that there is currently no convincing evidence that exposure to everyday levels of aluminium in any form increases the risks of Alzheimer’s disease, genetic damage or cancer. Aluminium is the most common metal in the earth’s crust and we are exposed to it all the time. It reacts with other elements to form aluminium salts, and small amounts of these are found naturally in almost all foods and drinking water, as well as in breast milk and in formula milk for babies. Aluminium salts are used as food additives (for example in bread and cakes) and in drugs such as antacids. It is widely used in food packaging. Aluminium is not used by the body. Any aluminium absorbed from food or other sources is gradually eliminated through the kidneys. Babies are born with aluminium already present in their bodies, probably from the mother’s blood.

Concerns about Diabetes

Whether vaccines can provide a “stimulus” triggering some dormant condition is a hot topic particularly regarding development of Type One Diabetes. Recently, an Australian study suggested that the live rotavirus vaccine since it was regularly given to babies there came along with a decrease in the number of cases of Type One Diabetes there.

Conclusion

The benefits of vaccinations outweigh the fears and concerns, so don’t be afraid of vaccinating!

EXTRA: Dr Robert Arlt is a private Consultant Paediatrician at Roseneath Medical Practice. He has a special interest in allergology and is very experienced in paediatric ultrasound.