News

GP in Richmond reviews / April 2018

Many thanks to all our patients for their very kind words!

 

 

>> Brilliant doctor with fabulous people skills, understanding and dedication. Has always been on call whenever we needed and always accommodates us. We definitely will not be going anywhere else (…) <<

>> Excellent care and support. Very organised and great personal service (…) <<

>> Excellent care, full explanation of reasons for tests. I have full confidence in the care provided by Dr. Soori (…) <<

>> As always I was seen promptly and examination of my condition was very detailed (…) <<

Coeliac disease

Did you know that untreated coeliac disease can lead to additional serious health problems?

coeliac disease

What is coeliac disease?

  • It is an autoimmune condition where the small intestine becomes inflamed and unable to absorb nutrients
  • It is caused by an adverse reaction to gluten , which is found in any food or drink containing wheat, barley, rye eg cereals, pasta, bread, cake, beer.
  • It is not an allergy or intolerance to gluten.
  • It is hereditary
  • It could result from environmental factors eg a digestive system infection in childhood

  • It is estimated that one in 100 people in UK have coeliac disease, and that nearly half a million people aren’t yet aware of their condition.

What are the symptoms?

  • diarrhoea  
  • abdominal pain
  • bloating
  • wind
  • indigestion 
  • nausea
  • constipation
  • hair loss
  • fatigue 
  • weight loss
  • itchy skin rash 
  • delayed growth/ puberty  

What are the risks of coeliac disease?

  • Malnutrition
  • Increased risk of other autoimmune diseases eg Type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Lymphoma and  bowel cancer
  • Unexplained infertility
  • Osteoporosis
  • Irritability and depression – children with coeliac disease are irritable
  • Low birthweight babies
  • Dental defects

How can coeliac disease be treated?

Currently the only treatment for coeliac disease is lifelong adherence to a strict gluten-free diet.

And the good news?

In most cases the symptoms can be reversed and the complications prevented by a gluten-free diet. Early diagnosis and treatment are key. See Dr Soori at Roseneath Medical Practice for full evaluation of your symptoms and same day blood tests to help identify if you may have coeliac disease. If required a specialist referral for a biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis can then be arranged.

Fatigue in children

FATIGUE IN CHILDREN

Fatigue is excessive tiredness. It is normal for a child to experience tiredness from time to time, especially when they have growth spurts. A simple nap or rest should help. However, if despite rest a child has an overwhelming need to sleep, it could indicate a problem.

Interestingly, children don’t usually complain of tiredness during the day, for fear of missing out on fun, even when they do feel a little tired. Instead, such concerns are typically noticed by the child’s parents or teachers. Therefore when a child does report tiredness or show obvious signs of fatigue, such situations should be explored further.

Possible causes:

  • Allergies – may cause prolonged or significant tiredness. Gluten intolerance or coeliac disease may cause chronic fatigue in children.
  • Depression – can be very emotionally and physically overwhelming to a child and depression in children often presents as tiredness.
  • Poor nutritional intake – Children may feel tired when they get hungry between meals, especially if their meals aren’t of sufficient nutritional value. A child needs a well-balanced diet rich in wholegrains and protein, whilst avoiding excess sugar and processed food. Healthy snacks are recommended between meals
  • Vitamin deficiency – e.g. vitamin d deficiency. Vitamin supplements are recommended for children in the UK, aged six months to five years.
  • Poor sleep – Children generally need at least ten hours of sleep to function well during the day. A good night’s sleep can prevent daytime tiredness for many kids.
  • Excessive exercise – a lot of children are very keen on sport but if this becomes excessive it may be that they are burning too many of the calories they consume.
  • Anaemia – when there aren’t enough healthy red cells to carry adequate oxygen to the body’s tissues. Tiredness can be a symptom of anaemia.
  • Infection (bacterial or viral) – the fatigue goes away when the infection clears.
  • Medication – e.g. antihistamines, cough medicines, painkillers, antidepressants.
  • Obesity, enlarged tonsils or adenoids – Obstructive sleep apnoea may result and thus cause interrupted sleep, further resulting in fatigue.
  • Chronic fatigue syndrome – usually caused by Glandular fever. Tiredness is the most common symptom.
  • Other diseases – e.g. asthma, hypothyroidism, diabetes, autoimmune diseases, heart disease, cancer

When to act:

When fatigue begins to disrupt your child’s normal routine, activities, education and quality of life, it is important to understand why he is so tired. In rare cases tiredness, combined with other symptoms e.g. weight loss, nosebleeds, visual changes, swellings, headaches, pain could occur due to childhood cancers. Most of the time however tiredness in children is caused by diet and lifestyle, but further evaluation should be undertaken.

What to do if your child experiences fatigue:

See a doctor for a full assessment of your child’s symptoms, examination and investigations to pinpoint the cause for the tiredness. A quick diagnosis can then be made and effective treatment can be commenced.

 

 

 

 

New Year’s resolutions

Did you know it is estimated that three-quarters of New Year’s resolutions are abandoned by the end  of February?

Why do people give up on their resolutions so quickly?

  • It takes time to make a new habit, or to lose a less healthy one. Any new exercise regime or diet takes a while to bed in.
  • We often set unrealistic goals and targets- for example, deciding to eat no sugar, give up carbohydrates completely or exercise every day for an hour.

How can you improve your chances of success?

  • Knowing your current health status is a good way to start-your cholesterol level, blood sugar level, blood pressure, body mass index, and being aware of your ideal measurements .
  • A good way to do this is to have a Health Assessment, personal to you, taking account of your age, gender, family history and lifestyle.
  • By knowing these parameters as well as others, your individual risk for heart disease can be calculated.  Other potentially serious conditions can also be screened for eg lung disease, cancers,  mental health problems. This means you can set goals that really improve your personal health, which are safe and realistic for you.

 

health assessment

 

How can we help?

  • At Roseneath Medical practice, Dr Sumi Soori offers a broad range of Health Assessments- Men, Women’s, Comprehensive health assessments,  Healthy heart, Cognitive assessments, Child health,  Fertility, Mental health etc all with same day results.  Referrals can be made as necessary to other health professionals, some on-site eg physiotherapy.
  • Making new habits and behaviours requires us to understand our responses to stress and other triggers. Dr Soori can help you to do this  through Cognitive Behavioural therapy, which can help increase your chance of sticking to you goals and achieving your resolutions.
  • So for 2018, rather than embark on fad diets or fitness regimes that you can’t keep to, why not book a health assessment to fully understand your current health status, and receive advice and support you to successfully achieve your goals.

Roseneath Medical Practice offers a 10% discount for health assessment bookings in January and February ‘18

Vitamin D deficiency

Did you know that as many as 1 in 5 adults and 1 in 5 children in the UK have low vitamin D levels?

Vitamin D deficiency

Why is vitamin D deficiency so common in the UK?

We gain some vitamin D from food, but most from sunlight.

What are the food sources of vitamin D?

  • Oily fish (such as salmon, mackerel and sardines), cod liver oil and other fish oils
  • Eggs
  • Meat
  • Mushrooms
  • fortified foods – such as most fat spreads and some breakfast cereals

Why is vitamin D important for our health?

  • For our bone and muscle health
  • Deficiency is associated with Diabetes, Heart disease, Breast cancer, Bowel cancer, Alzheimer’s disease

Who is at risk of Vitamin D deficiency?

  • Pregnant and breastfeeding women
  • Under 5 year olds
  • Over 65 year olds
  • People who have little or no exposure to the sun eg those who cover-up for cultural reasons, people who are housebound or who stay indoors for long periods of time.
  • People with darker skin (these groups are not able to make as much vitamin D as those with paler skin).

How does vitamin D deficiency present itself?

  • Many have no symptoms or only vague symptoms of tiredness or body aches
  • Proximal muscle weakness
  • Rib, hip, pelvis, thigh and foot pain are typical
  • Fractures
  • Extreme cases can cause rickets in children, osteomalacia in adults

How can you find out if you have vitamin D deficiency?

  • A simple blood test done by Dr Sumi Soori at Roseneath Medical Practice, with same day results.
  • This may be combined with further blood tests to look for changes linked to low vitamin D and possible referral for wrist x-ray in a child to check on bone development.